Follow these tips to protect baby wildlife, their parents, and your pets!

 

  • Avoid “kidnapping” baby birds. Most birds learn how to fly from the ground up! If the baby bird is mostly feathered and uninjured, leave it on the ground and monitor for parent activity from a distance.
  • Try to limit any pruning or tree trimming during baby season. The safest time to trim is November, December, and January. If you must trim or remove a tree, be vigilant of any nests and have a plan in place for “re-nesting” the babies.
  • Scan your backyard before letting your dog out. Doing a quick walk-around inspection of your yard for wildlife is the best way to prevent pet and wildlife interactions that can lead to injuries for both animals.
  • Keep cats indoors when at all possible. Domestic cats are the number one threat to our native birds! If you feed your cat outside, feed them and then remove the food after 15 to 20 min. This will help prevent wildlife from coming to your yard in search of food.
  • Cover the drainage grates in your driveway with rubber floor mats (make sure the floor mat has small holes). This will prevent ducklings from falling through and getting trapped but still allows for proper drainage.
  • Clear all debris piles during the winter months to prevent wildlife from using your yard as a nesting site. Make sure all boats, sheds, and trash cans are properly and securely closed and sealed. This will discourage wildlife from using these items to raise their young.
  • Avoid using trappers to remove wildlife, especially during nesting season. So often this leaves orphans behind and causes premature death. Please call SFWC for humane deterrent options.
  • Wild baby bunnies are only visited twice a day by their mothers, this helps to keep predators away from the nest. If you find a nest of baby bunnies that look healthy, clean, and warm please leave them be. If you are mowing your lawn, please keep an eye out for nests and avoid them!
  • Keep your bird feeders and birdbaths clean. This helps prevent the spread of contagious diseases in wildlife populations.
  • Be extra vigilant when driving at night. Mother opossums are on the move and often get hit by cars. If you see an opossum that was hit by a car, please check the pouch for babies, but only if you can do so safely. If you find joeys in the pouch, please bring the mother’s body to us so that we can safely remove the joeys.
  • In urban environments and especially during baby season, it is not uncommon to see raccoons and foxes out during the day. They are typically in search of the extra food they need to feed their young.